Boxer (dog)

Size: Height Range: Weight Range: Small: 5'0

Boxers can shed quite a bit, but weekly brushing with a bristle brush or hard rubber grooming mitt will help keep hair under control.

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Boxers will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. They are fairly active indoors and do best with at least an average-sized yard. Boxers are temperature sensitive, getting easily overheated and chilling very quickly. Exercise. An active, athletic breed, Boxers need daily work or exercise, as well as a long brisk, daily walk. They also enjoy fetching a ball or other sessions of play.
Men's Boxer Sizes: SIZE WAIST LENGTH; inch cm inch cm; SMALL: 28 - 71 - MEDIUM: 32 - 81 -
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Boxers will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. They are fairly active indoors and do best with at least an average-sized yard. Boxers are temperature sensitive, getting easily overheated and chilling very quickly. Exercise. An active, athletic breed, Boxers need daily work or exercise, as well as a long brisk, daily walk. They also enjoy fetching a ball or other sessions of play.
Highlights

To make sure your underwear has the best fit and comfort possible, use the Fruit of the Loom underwear size chart which will help you find the correct size of men’s, women's or kid’s underwear.

Easy to train dogs are more adept at forming an association between a prompt such as the word "sit" , an action sitting , and a consequence getting a treat very quickly. Other dogs need more time, patience, and repetition during training. Many breeds are intelligent but approach training with a "What's in it for me?

Dogs who were bred for jobs that require decision making, intelligence, and concentration, such as herding livestock, need to exercise their brains, just as dogs who were bred to run all day need to exercise their bodies.

If they don't get the mental stimulation they need, they'll make their own work -- usually with projects you won't like, such as digging and chewing. Obedience training and interactive dog toys are good ways to give a dog a brain workout, as are dog sports and careers, such as agility and search and rescue.

Common in most breeds during puppyhood and in retriever breeds at all ages, mouthiness means a tendency to nip, chew, and play-bite a soft, fairly painless bite that doesn't puncture the skin. Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or "herd" their human family members, and they need training to learn that it's fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people. Mouthy breeds tend to really enjoy a game of fetch, as well as a good chew on a chew toy that's been stuffed with kibble and treats.

Some breeds sound off more often than others. When choosing a breed, think about how the dog vocalizes — with barks or howls — and how often. If you're considering a hound, would you find their trademark howls musical or maddening? If you're considering a watchdog, will a city full of suspicious "strangers" put him on permanent alert?

Will the local wildlife literally drive your dog wild? Do you live in housing with noise restrictions? Do you have neighbors nearby? Some breeds are more free-spirited than others. Nordic dogs such as Siberian Huskies were bred to range long distances, and given the chance, they'll take off after anything that catches their interest. And many hounds simply must follow their noses, or that bunny that just ran across the path, even if it means leaving you behind.

High-energy dogs are always ready and waiting for action. Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday. They need a significant amount of exercise and mental stimulation, and they're more likely to spend time jumping, playing, and investigating any new sights and smells. Low-energy dogs are the canine equivalent of a couch potato, content to doze the day away.

When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you'll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying. A vigorous dog may or may not be high-energy, but everything he does, he does with vigor: These dynamos need lots of training to learn good manners, and may not be the best fit for a home with young kids or someone who's elderly or frail. A low-vigor dog, on the other hand, has a more subdued approach to life.

Some breeds do fine with a slow evening stroll around the block. Others need daily, vigorous exercise -- especially those that were originally bred for physically demanding jobs, such as herding or hunting. Without enough exercise, these breeds may put on weight and vent their pent-up energy in ways you don't like, such as barking, chewing, and digging. Breeds that need a lot of exercise are good for outdoorsy, active people, or those interested in training their dog to compete in a high-energy dog sport, such as agility.

Some dogs are perpetual puppies -- always begging for a game -- while others are more serious and sedate. Although a playful pup sounds endearing, consider how many games of fetch or tag you want to play each day, and whether you have kids or other dogs who can stand in as playmates for the dog.

See Dogs Not Kid Friendly. Anything whizzing by — cats, squirrels, perhaps even cars — can trigger that instinct. Dogs that like to chase need to be leashed or kept in a fenced area when outdoors, and you'll need a high, secure fence in your yard.

These breeds generally aren't a good fit for homes with smaller pets that can look like prey, such as cats, hamsters, or small dogs. Breeds that were originally used for bird hunting, on the other hand, generally won't chase, but you'll probably have a hard time getting their attention when there are birds flying by.

See Dogs With Low Intensity. Boxers are large, muscular, square-headed dogs who look imposing — that is, until you look into their eyes and see the mischief and joy of life reflected there. Because of their playful nature and boundless energy, they are sometimes called the "Peter Pan" of the dog breeds. Boxers aren't considered fully mature until they are three years old, meaning they have one of the longest puppyhoods in the world of dogs. The typical Boxer is intelligent, alert, and fearless, yet friendly.

He's loyal to his family and loves to play with them, but he's also headstrong, especially if you try to use harsh training methods with him.

With minimal grooming needs and legendary patience and gentleness with children, Boxers are great family companions, as long as you provide them with the physical exercise and mental stimulation they need. If you're willing and able to provide them with adequate exercise in the form of walks or runs, they can even adapt to apartment living, so long as they are able to be close to their beloved people.

Boxers originated in Germany and were brought to the U. Their short, shiny coats are striking: All white or mostly white Boxers are not desirable because genetically, deafness is associated with white coloring. Many Boxers have docked tails and cropped ears. If the ears are not cropped, they will hang down.

Many dog owners are opting to leave their Boxers' ears uncropped these days. Boxers are renowned for their great love of and loyalty to their families. They often are distrustful of strangers at first, but will not be aggressive unless they perceive a threat to their families. Boxers are so loving that they often think they are lapdogs and try to lie as close to you as possible. Boxer owners around the world take special delight in their beloved dogs' clownish behavior.

Boxers are high-spirited, happy, and energetic. They often paw, cat-like, at their toys, food bowls, and even their owners. When they are excited, they often "kidney bean," a little dance that involves twisting their bodies into a semi-circle, similar to the shape of a kidney bean, and then turning in circles.

Boxers also make a unique sound, called a "woo-woo," when they want something or are excited. It is not exactly a bark, but rather sounds as though they are saying "woo-woo," look at me! Watching a Boxer run is a delight. They are so exuberant, happy, and graceful, it's sure to bring a smile to your face, especially if they start jumping something they love to do , twisting, and even turning somersaults to entertain you.

But life isn't all fun and games for all Boxers. Because of their strength and courage, Boxers have a wide use in the military and the police, as well as search-and-rescue work. When specifically trained for guard work, Boxers are excellent watchdogs and will restrain an intruder in the same manner as a Mastiff. Boxers also excel in obedience, agility, and schutzhund a demanding three-phase competition event that tests the dog's tracking, obedience, and protection abilities.

Boxers should not be left outdoors for extended periods of time. Their short nose doesn't cool hot air efficiently in the summer, and their short coat doesn't keep them warm in the winter.

Many Boxer people joke that their Boxers' range of tolerance is between 72 and 74 degrees Fahrenheit degrees Celsius. Boxers aren't the breed for everyone, but if you like a big dog who likes to cuddle, don't mind a little drool between friends, want a dog that will delight you with his clownish antics and yet be gentle with your children, and most of all, if you are prepared to keep your Boxer physically and mentally stimulated, the Boxer just might be the right dog for you!

Boxers are high-energy dogs and need a lot of exercise. Make sure you have the time, desire, and energy to give them the play and activity they need. Boxers are exuberant and will greet you ecstatically. Early, consistent training is critical — before your Boxer gets too big to handle! Although they are large, Boxers are not "outdoor dogs. Boxers mature slowly and act like rambunctious puppies for several years.

Boxers don't just like to be around their family — they need to be around them! If left alone for too long or kept in the backyard away from people, they can become ill-tempered and destructive. Boxers drool, a lot. Boxers also snore, loudly. Although they have short hair, Boxers shed, especially in the spring. Boxers are intelligent and respond well to firm but fun training. They also have an independent streak and don't like to be bossed around or treated harshly.

You'll have the biggest success in training your Boxer if you can make it fun for him. Some Boxers take their guarding duties a little too seriously, while others may not exhibit any guarding instincts at all. To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.

The Boxer's ancestors were the German Bullenbeisser a dog that descended from Mastiffs and the Bulldog. The Bullenbeisser had been used as a hunting dog for centuries to hunt bear, wild boar, and deer. Its task was to catch and hold the prey until hunters arrived.

Over time, Bullenbeissers lost their jobs on estates and began to be used by farmers and butchers to guard and drive cattle. The Boxer we know today was developed in the late 19th century. A Munich man named Georg Alt bred a brindle-colored female Bullenbeisser named Flora with a local dog of unknown origin.

In the litter was a fawn-and-white male that was named Lechner's Box. This is believed to be the start of the line that would become the Boxer we know today. Lechner's Box was bred to his dam, Flora, and one of the litter was a female called Alt's Schecken.

She was registered as a Bierboxer or Modern Bullenbeiser. Schecken was then bred to an English Bulldog named Tom to produce a dog named Flocki, who became the first Boxer to be entered in the German Stud Book after winning at a Munich show that had a special event for Boxers. Flocki's sister, a white female, was even more influential when she was mated with Piccolo von Angertor, a grandson of Lechner's Box. One of her pups was a white female named Meta von der Passage, who is considered to be the mother of the Boxer breed even though photographs of her show that she bore little resemblance to the modern Boxer.

John Wagner, author of The Boxer first published in said the following about her: Our great line of sires all trace directly back to this female. She was a substantially built, low to the ground, brindle and white parti-color, lacking in underjaw and exceedingly lippy.

As a producing bitch few in any breed can match her record. She consistently whelped puppies of marvelous type and rare quality. Those of her offspring sired by Flock St. Salvator and Wotan dominate all present-day. This was done in Munich in , and the next year they founded the first Boxer Club. The breed became known in other parts of Europe in the late s. Around , the first Boxers were imported into the U.

Lehman of New York. Unfortunately, there weren't many female Boxers in the U. When Word War I broke out, Boxers were enlisted into the military, serving as messenger dogs, carrying packs, and acting as attack and guard dogs. Boxers started becoming popular in the U. Through them, the breed was introduced to more people and soon became a favorite companion animal, show dog, and guard dog. In the early days, there was a lot of controversy within the club about the Boxer standard. In , the club finally approved a new standard.

The latest revisions of the standard were in Today, the Boxer ranks 7th among the breeds and varieties registered by the AKC. Males typically stand Females typically stand 21 to The Boxer is described as a "hearing" guard dog, meaning he's alert and watchful. When he's not clowning for you, he's dignified and self-assured. With children, he's playful and patient. Strangers are greeted with a wary attitude, but he responds politely to friendly people. He's aggressive only in defense of his family and home.

Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner.

Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.

Like every dog, Boxers need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Boxer puppy grows up to be a well-rounded, outgoing, friendly dog and stays that way. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Boxers are generally healthy, but like all breeds, they're prone to certain health conditions. Not all Boxers will get any or all of these diseases, but it's important to be aware of them if you're considering this breed.

If you're buying a puppy, find a good breeder who will show you health clearances for both your puppy's parents. Health clearances prove that a dog has been tested for and cleared of a particular condition.

In Boxers, you should expect to see health clearances from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals OFA for hip dysplasia with a score of fair or better , elbow dysplasia, hypothyroidism, and von Willebrand's disease; from Auburn University for thrombopathia; and from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation CERF certifying that eyes are normal.

You can confirm health clearances by checking the OFA web site offa. Boxers are especially prone to the developing mast cell tumors, lymphoma, and brain tumors. White Boxers and Boxers with excessive white markings can be sunburned and may even develop skin cancer. If your Boxer is light-colored, apply sunscreen on his ears, nose, and coat when he goes outdoors. This is one of the most common heart defects found in Boxers.

The aorta narrows below the aortic valve, forcing the heart to work harder to supply blood to the body. This condition can cause fainting and even sudden death. It's an inherited condition, but its mode of transmission isn't known at this time. Typically, a veterinary cardiologist diagnoses this condition after a heart murmur has been detected. Dogs with this condition should not be bred. BCM is an inherited condition. The dog' heart sometimes beats erratically arrhythmia due to an electrical conduction disorder.

This can cause weakness, collapse, or sudden death. Because it is difficult to detect this condition, it can cause an unexpected death. Boxers who show signs of this condition should not be bred.

This is a heritable condition in which the thighbone doesn't fit snugly into the hip joint. Some dogs show pain and lameness on one or both rear legs, but you may not notice any signs of discomfort in a dog with hip dysplasia. As the dog ages, arthritis can develop. Dogs with hip dysplasia should not be bred.

If you're buying a puppy, ask the breeder for proof that the parents have been tested for hip dysplasia and are free of problems. Hip dysplasia is hereditary, but it can also be triggered by environmental factors, such as rapid growth from a high-calorie diet or injuries incurred from jumping or falling on slick floors. Treatment ranges from supplements that support joint function to total hip replacement. Hypothyroidism is caused by a deficiency of thyroid hormone and may produce signs that include infertility, obesity, mental dullness, and lack of energy.

The dog's fur may become coarse and brittle and begin to fall out, while the skin becomes tough and dark. Hypothyroidism can be managed very well with a thyroid replacement pill daily. Medication must continue throughout the dog's life. Their height, measured at the shoulder will range between 22 to 25 inches cm Females: Adult females will range between 55 to 65 pounds kg. Their height, measured at the shoulder will range between 21 to 24 inches 53 to 61 cm.

Keeping this in mind, one can have a female that is 24 inches and 55 pounds…and another that is 21 inches and 65 pounds. This means that with both fitting into the standard, one will be short and stocky…the other taller and leaner. Therefore, with there being some wiggle room regarding the numbers, Boxers will have varied frames. The neck size of a full grown adult Boxer dog will be from 13 to 22 inches 33 to Elements That Affect the Size of Boxer Dogs When breeders bred specially for show and remember that when they do so, only a small percentage of the puppies will actually be top show quality , the dogs in general will be on the smaller end of the size scale and a bit more chiseled than their counterparts.

When Boxers are bred not for show, but rather for a stronger sturdier appearance, this is often referred to as working lines and not show lines. With the goal of remaining in the size range standard, these dogs will in general be at the top of the size scale and have more bulk. Therefore, who you purchase your Boxer from and what their breeding program goals are will play a role in the ultimate size of your dog.

One must remember that show line breeders will have many puppies who are just wonderful, but falling a tad short of what is needed to conceivably win a ribbon, will be sold as pets breeding rights will not be given.

Final Boxer dog size cannot be determined for several years. Most puppies will grow in both height and weight until the age of 18 months minimum and 24 months maximum. Now, this refers to most…there will always be exceptions. But growth does not stop there…After full height is reached, the Boxer will then continue to grow in girth until the age of 2 to 3 years old.

With many, the time between 1.

The Boxer is a medium-sized, short-haired breed of dog, developed in Germany. The coat is smooth and tight-fitting; colors are fawn or brindled, with or without white markings, and white. When Boxers are bred not for show, but rather for a stronger sturdier appearance, this is often referred to as working lines and not show lines. With the goal of remaining in the size range standard, these dogs will (in general) be at the top of the size scale and have more bulk. To make sure your underwear has the best fit and comfort possible, use the Fruit of the Loom underwear size chart which will help you find the correct size of men’s, women's or kid’s underwear.